<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_quote"><div>Maxwell,</div><div> </div><div>Happy to loan out my disks.   I haven't looked at them in years, but I'm sure they're five-and-a-quarter-inch floppies.  PC/IX will drive a color monitor -- not a trivial statement, since most monitors back then were B&W-only.</div>

<div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">You couldn't do a lot with Unix back then (no X, no 3D, no easy ipv4)<br>
but you could do things.. right?<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Does "make a living" count?   And that was even before everyone switched to nfs4. :-)</div><div><br></div><div>INTERACTIVE Systems Corporation was the first commercial UNIX vendor (1977).  Our first customer was a law firm that wanted our word-processing facilities, which included the INed screen editor (a technology invented, independently, by Edgar T. Irons and Bill Joy), and a formatter (nroff/troff with Ted Dolotta's -mm macro package).  The two, along with tools like a spell-checker (spell(1)) were marketed as INtext.   Both Irons and Dolotta were VPs of ISC.</div>

<div><br></div><div>We also had a block-mode terminal (INterm), designed by Charles Minter, a student of Carver Mead's, which had a bunch of INed in firmware, which let our systems support a lot more users doing text-processing than they could have otherwise.</div>

<div><br></div><div>Another early customer was Wells Fargo Bank, I suspect for the same reason.</div><div><br></div><div>Plus, Ken Thompson made it possible to run Spacewar if you got bored, though I don't think our distro came with a port.</div>

<div><br></div><div>By 1983, when I joined them, someone at IBM had decided to provide Unix on their exciting, new powerhouse, the PC/XT -- the first mass-market personal computer with a Winchester (hard) disk.    (I think the XT was as powerful as a PDP-11/20, FWIW.)   </div>

<div><br></div><div>They hired ISC to do the work, since they didn't have anyone who knew anything about UNIX.  For that matter, neither did anyone else.</div><div><br></div><div>As an aside, the same piece of hardware motivated a major change in their flagship microcomputer operating system, PC-DOS (MS-DOS): subdirectories (folders).  Ten megabytes was so much storage that it no longer made sense to try to keep all your files in the same directory.</div>

<div><br></div></div>-- <br>Jeffrey Haemer <<a href="mailto:jeffrey.haemer@gmail.com">jeffrey.haemer@gmail.com</a>><br>720-837-8908 [cell],  @goyishekop [twitter]<br><a href="http://seejeffrun.blogspot.com">http://seejeffrun.blogspot.com</a> [blog], <a href="http://www.youtube.com/user/goyishekop">http://www.youtube.com/user/goyishekop</a> [vlog]<br>

<br><br>
</div>