<div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Jul 9, 2012 at 6:18 PM, David L. Anselmi <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:anselmi@anselmi.us" target="_blank">anselmi@anselmi.us</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
I agree with Steve.<br>
<br>
Information from traceroute may be helpful, and descriptions about the devices along the way.<br></blockquote><div><br>There's no interesting network that I can see.  They are on the same subnet:<br><br>[software@saratoga build-jaws-svn]$ traceroute warsaw<br>
traceroute to <a href="http://warsaw.stirlingsystems.net">warsaw.stirlingsystems.net</a> (192.168.1.21), 30 hops max, 38 byte packets<br> 1  warsaw (192.168.1.21)  0.205 ms !<10>  0.181 ms !<10>  0.138 ms !<10><br>
<br>Everything is Linux.  Warsaw is a rather old Fedora Core 4 (!) system.  I don't believe either is running a firewall.<br><br>Michael<br> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">
<div class="im">
Michael Hirsch wrote:<br>
> ssh: connect to host warsaw port 22: No route to host<br>
<br>
</div>The message means you got an ICMP host unreachable message.  So you got to the router for the host's<br>
network but then the host didn't answer when ARPed for its MAC.  (If you hadn't gotten to the end of<br>
the trail you'd have gotten a network unreachable message.)<br>
<br>
So, is there a reason the host is slow to answer ARP?  Or misses/mis-answers the first ARP?<br>
<br>
Of course in this day and age there are lots of other possibilities.  Perhaps SSH says host<br>
unreachable for more than one kind of ICMP.<br>
<br>
Sometimes firewalls will send an ICMP rather than dropping packets (REJECT vs DROP in iptables).  So<br>
it could be any device along the way interfering.  It's weird to get intermittent behavior but who<br>
knows--all kinds of state can be kept in iptables, and it can behave differently for ping and TCP.<br>
<br>
What does wireshark show on both ends?<br>
<br>
Here's a mean trick: you could probably set up iptables to send echo replies to any echo request<br>
that comes in, and drop all TCP traffic.  "I can ping everyone on the Internet but can't connect to<br>
anyone."<br>
<br>
Dave<br>
<div class="HOEnZb"><div class="h5">_______________________________________________<br>
Web Page:  <a href="http://lug.boulder.co.us" target="_blank">http://lug.boulder.co.us</a><br>
Mailing List: <a href="http://lists.lug.boulder.co.us/mailman/listinfo/lug" target="_blank">http://lists.lug.boulder.co.us/mailman/listinfo/lug</a><br>
Join us on IRC: <a href="http://irc.hackingsociety.org" target="_blank">irc.hackingsociety.org</a> port=6667 channel=#hackingsociety<br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br>